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Hanging out with friends, ways in which to connect.

Hanging out with friends, ways in which to connect.

by Leonard Hughes -
Number of replies: 0

The realisation that we are living through a major global event has put many of us into a spin, it is now more important we stay connected finding ways to remain social.

Some restrictions to be relaxed today Monday 18 May 2020

Monday 18th May, you can catch up with friends inside/outside if you follow the social distancing rules.  You must remain 1.5 metres apart no groups bigger than 20, try catch up for:

·         Lunch

·         Study group

·         Even call to campus and use the library and use Free WIFI.

·         Or just simply hangout

If you would like to share your contact details we can arrange for you to have 5 minutes at the start of class to share, mobile number, email or even arrange a gathering (within social distancing parameters).

It's understandable to think that this would put socialising on hold, but we live in a technological age in which, where there's a will, technology has a way, further down are six apps that can improve your social connections. 

 

1.      Houseparty

It's a video chat app for up to eight people at a time, you're notified when a friend is online. You can begin to talk to them, or have them join a conversation you're already in.

The video window sits above any other apps you may be using, so you can multitask important jobs unbridled, such as finding that meme you saw three hours ago without losing sight of your friend's face.

On that note, you can screen share, leave 'facemails' (a video voicemail) and can play games with the group, too.

You've also got the option to keep your conversation private, or open to allow anyone in your contacts base to join in. It's available on iOS, Android, Mac and PC.

2.      Google Hangouts

Like Houseparty, Google Hangouts is another group video chat service. It uses your Google account, which you'll have if you've ever opened a Gmail account or made a YouTube channel. You can have up to 50 people in a single call, and anyone you invite, Google account or not, can join via a link.It can also link up to your calendar, allowing you to create regular Hangout events, taking the stress out of manually organising each week's session.

If you have Chromecast, you can stream your hangout onto your TV, which is useful if multiple members of your household are going to be part of the chat, saving you all from crowding around your computer. It's available on iOS, Android, Mac and PC.

3.      Bunch

Bunch is an app that lets you play mobile games with your friends. All you need to do is start the game via Bunch and text them a link.

A video chat of up to eight people sits along the top of your screen, so you can see their reactions live as you burn down their Minecraft house or serve a killer Scrabble chain.

The app hosts several its own games, such as Trivia and Charades and is compatible with some existing mobile games you might have already. It's available on iOS and Android.

4.      Drawful

If your friendship group thrives on silliness, then Drawful is for you.

It's an online multiplayer game in which one person is issued a directive to draw something ridiculous on their mobile screen (without the use of an eraser).

The others in the group then submit their wild guesses as to what the drawing is. The guesses are pooled, and each person selects the one they think is correct.

For an added layer of absurdity, the drawer also submits a decoy guess to try to trip up the others. It's available on iOS, Android, Mac and PC.

5.      Whatsapp

Message your friends and family for free*. WhatsApp uses your phone's Internet connection to send messages, so you can avoid SMS fees.

Keep in touch with the groups of people that matter the most, like your family. With group chats, you can share messages, photos, and videos with up to 256 people at once. You can also name your group, mute or customize notifications, and more.

With voice calls, you can talk to your friends and family for free*, even if they're in another country. And with free* video calls, you can have face-to-face conversations for when voice or text just isn't enough. WhatsApp voice and video calls use your phone's Internet connection, instead of your cell plan's voice minutes, so you don't have to worry about expensive calling charges. It's available on iOS, Android.

 

6.      Zoom

It's a video chat app for up to 100 people at a time, and a free account lets you video chat for 40 minutes, if that’s not long enough start the meeting again. You can begin to talk to them, or have them join a conversation you're already in.

The video window sits above any other apps you may be using, so you can multitask important jobs unbridled, such as finding that meme you saw three hours ago without losing sight of your friend's face.

You've also got the option to keep your text conversation private, or open to allow anyone in your meeting to join in. It's available on iOS, Android, Mac and PC.

 

If you would like training on Zoom or would like advice on social distancing we can help, just email mit.info@murdochinstitute.wa.edu.au  and we will assist you.